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Table of contents
1.
Introduction
2.
What Are Confidence Intervals in Inferential Statistics?
3.
Why Are Confidence Intervals Important?
4.
How to Calculate a Confidence Interval
5.
Interpreting the Results of a Confidence Interval
6.
Examples of Confidence Intervals in Real-World Research
6.1.
Confidence interval for a population mean (μ)
6.2.
Confidence interval for a population proportion (p)
6.3.
The margin of error
7.
Difference between inferential statistics and descriptive statistics 
8.
Frequently Asked Questions
8.1.
How are confidence intervals calculated?
8.2.
What do confidence intervals indicate?
8.3.
How should confidence intervals be interpreted?
8.4.
What is the relationship between confidence level, sample size, and margin of error?
9.
Conclusion
Last Updated: Mar 27, 2024
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Confidence Intervals in Inferential Statistics

Author yuvatimankar
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Introduction

Statistics is one of the most important skills needed to build a career as a Data Scientist. Statistics is a branch of mathematics that is connected to the analysis, presentation, interpretation, and collection of data. The statistics domain can be further divided into two main categories: Inferential and Descriptive statistics. Inferential statistics interpret the sample data to make inferences about a larger portion. Descriptive statistics describes and summarizes the characteristics of sampled data without generating any inferences about the larger population.

Confidence Interval in Integral Statistics

This article will discuss the confidence intervals in inference statistics, why they are essential, and how to calculate and properly interpret the confidence intervals examples.

What Are Confidence Intervals in Inferential Statistics?

Confidence intervals are reliable estimates of unknown population parameters calculated from sample data and the margin of error. Based on the sample results, they provide a range of plausible values for the true mean. A confidence interval is a measure of the precision of an estimate based on the desired confidence level and margin of error. Typical confidence levels include 90%, 95%, and 99%. Consider the mean, sample size, standard deviation, and desired level to calculate a confidence interval. The formula incorporates the critical value, which corresponds to your confidence level. The confidence interval estimate can then be expressed as:

Sample Mean ± (Critical Value) x (Standard Deviation/√Sample Size)


Confidence intervals are a fundamental concept in inferential statistics and help determine how much certainty can be attributed to a sample statistic as an estimate of a population parameter. Using confidence intervals leads to more accurate interpretations and conclusions.

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Why Are Confidence Intervals Important?

Confidence intervals are a fundamental part of inferential statistics. They provide an estimated range of values likely to contain an unknown population parameter with a certain confidence level. This allows researchers to quantify the uncertainty in their estimates.

There are a few reasons why confidence intervals are important:

  • They indicate how precise an estimate is. Wider intervals indicate less precision, while narrower intervals indicate greater precision. Precision depends on factors like sample size.
     
  • They can be used to determine if a sample statistic is significantly different from a population parameter. The difference is statistically significant if a confidence interval does not contain the hypothesized population value.
     
  • They allow for conclusions to be drawn about the population based on a sample. One can infer the population parameter by calculating a confidence interval around a sample statistic.
     
  • They provide more information than a point estimate alone. Confidence intervals give a range of convincing values for a population parameter rather than a single value. This gives a more accurate sense of what the parameter could be.


Confidence intervals are a key concept in inferential statistics that allows researchers to make inferences about populations based on samples. They provide information about the precision of estimates and allow conclusions to be drawn regarding whether a sample result reflects a real effect or difference in the population. For these reasons, confidence intervals are integral to statistical analysis and research.

How to Calculate a Confidence Interval

A confidence interval is a range of values calculated from sample data likely to contain the true population parameter. To calculate a confidence interval, you need the sample mean (M), sample standard deviation (SD), sample size (n), and desired confidence level. The confidence level, often 95%, indicates how sure you can be that the interval contains the population mean.

To calculate a confidence interval:

  • Step 1: Determine your confidence level, for example, 95%. This means there is a 95% chance the interval will contain the population mean.
     
  • Step 2: Find the critical value (z) in the z-table corresponding to your confidence level. For 95% confidence, z = 1.96.
     
  • Step 3: Calculate the mean's standard error (SE): SE = SD/√n. The standard error depends on the variability in the sample (the standard deviation) and the sample size.
     
  • Step 4: Calculate the margin of error (ME) using the formula: ME = z* x SE. The margin of error depends on the confidence level and standard error.
     
  • Step 5: Calculate the confidence interval:
     
Lower limit = M - ME
Upper limit = M + ME

 

For example, if a sample of 25 students has a mean reading score of 82 with a 6 standard deviation, the 95% confidence interval would be:

Confidence level  95%, z* = 1.96
SE 6/√25 = 1.2
ME 1.96 x 1.2 = 2.352
Lower limit 82 - 2.352 = 79.648
Upper Limit 82 + 2.352 = 84.352.

Therefore, the 95% confidence interval for the population mean reading score based on this sample is 79.648 to 84.352. There is a 95% chance this interval contains the true population mean reading score.

Interpreting the Results of a Confidence Interval

A confidence interval is a range of values that likely contains the true population parameter. Its confidence level, typically 95% or 99%, indicates how certain the interval is that it contains the actual parameter value. To interpret a confidence interval, note the confidence level and examine the interval's lower and upper bounds. A narrow interval indicates more precision, while a wider interval signals less precision.

A confidence interval is calculated based on a sample from the population, with the center providing an estimate of the population parameter. The width of the interval reflects the variability and uncertainty in the sample. Larger samples produce narrower confidence intervals, while additional replicates or experiments increase precision. Confidence intervals offer more information than a simple point estimate, conveying uncertainty and allowing for probabilistic inferences regarding the population parameter.

Users can determine if the interval is narrow enough for the intended purpose and if additional data may be needed to increase precision. Confidence intervals also facilitate comparisons across groups or conditions, as non-overlapping intervals indicate potential differences.

Examples of Confidence Intervals in Real-World Research

Confidence intervals are a range of values that act as an estimate for a population parameter.

Researchers calculate confidence intervals to determine the reliability and accuracy of sample statistics. The most common type of confidence interval used in research is

Confidence interval for a population mean (μ)

For calculating a confidence interval for a population mean (μ), researchers need the sample mean (M), standard deviation (σ), and sample size (n). The formula is:

M ± Z*σ/√n


Where Z corresponds to the desired confidence level. For a 95% confidence interval, Z = 1.96. This interval provides an estimated range of values within which the population means likely lies.

Confidence interval for a population proportion (p)

For a population proportion (p), researchers need the sample proportion (p̂), sample size (n), and Z-score corresponding to the desired confidence level. The formula is:

p̂ ± Z*√(p̂(1-p̂)/n)


This interval estimates the range of values within which the true population proportion is likely to fall.

The margin of error

It is the maximum expected difference between a sample statistic and a population parameter, calculated as the radius of the confidence interval. It depends on confidence level, standard deviation, and sample size. Confidence intervals estimate plausible values for population parameters. They are widely reported in research to indicate the reliability and accuracy of results.

Difference between inferential statistics and descriptive statistics 

Statistic Descriptive Statistics Inferential Statistics
Description Summarizes and describes the data. Makes inferences about the population from which the data was collected.
Data It can be either a population or a sample. Always based on data from a sample.
Goal To describe the data or to make inferences about the population. To make inferences about the population, but there is always some uncertainty associated with these inferences.
Techniques Measures of measures of variability, central tendency, and graphical representations. Probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and estimation.

Frequently Asked Questions

How are confidence intervals calculated?

Confidence intervals are calculated using sample statistics and margin of error, with larger sample sizes resulting in narrower confidence intervals and higher confidence levels resulting in wider intervals.

What do confidence intervals indicate?

Confidence intervals show a range of values for an unknown population parameter based on sample statistics. Wider intervals indicate more uncertainty, while narrower intervals indicate precision. Confidence intervals do not definitively prove a population parameter lies within a given range. Repeated sampling and recalculated confidence intervals may result in the actual parameter falling within the specified interval percentage of the time.

How should confidence intervals be interpreted?

Confidence intervals represent plausible values for unknown population parameters based on a sample, with 95% of calculated intervals containing the actual population parameter if repeated.

What is the relationship between confidence level, sample size, and margin of error?

The confidence level, sample size, and margin of error are directly related. Higher confidence levels require wider margins of error, resulting in broader confidence intervals. Larger sample sizes produce smaller margins of error and narrower confidence intervals. A larger sample size is needed to obtain more precise intervals with the same confidence level.

Conclusion

In this article, we have discussed Confidence Intervals in Inferential Statistics. We covered topics such as introduction, why Confidence Interval in Inferential Statistics is important, calculating a confidence interval, Examples of Confidence Interval, and the difference between inferential Statistics and descriptive Statistics. 

We hope this blog has helped you enhance your Confidence Intervals in Inferential Statistics knowledge. If you want to learn more, then check out our articles


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