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Table of contents
1.
✨Introduction
2.
✨Observing and Viewing an API in Postman
2.1.
🎇Uptime Monitoring
2.2.
🎇 Collection-Based Monitoring
3.
✨Managing and Sharing an API in Postman
3.1.
🎇Signing up for Postman
3.2.
🎇Updating Postman Account
4.
✨Setting up Mock Servers in Postman
4.1.
Step 1: Sending a request.
4.2.
Step 2: Save the request to a collection
4.3.
Step 3: Save a response as an example
4.4.
Step 4: Create a mock server for the collection
4.5.
Step 5: Send a request to the mock server
4.6.
Step 6: Add another example
5.
✨Mocking with the Postman API
5.1.
Step 1: Set up a collection for mocking
5.2.
Step 2: Retrieve the collection ID
5.3.
Step 3: Create a mock server with the Postman API
5.4.
Step 4: Get the mock server URL
5.5.
Step 5: Send a request to the mock server
6.
Frequently Asked Questions
6.1.
Is Postman just a tool for testing APIs?
6.2.
What is the Postman API capable of?
6.3.
What in Postman is a header?
6.4.
How many methods does Postman have?
7.
Conclusion
Last Updated: Mar 27, 2024

Setting up Mock Servers with Some Examples in Postman

Author Kumar Saurav
0 upvote
Master Python: Predicting weather forecasts
Speaker
Ashwin Goyal
Product Manager @

✨Introduction

Setting up Mock Servers with Some Examples in Postman is an article under the Postman testing tool which offers a complete API development platform with numerous built-in tools that support each stage of the API lifecycle. In the article Setting up Mock Servers with Some Examples in Postman, one can design, mock, debug, run automated tests, document, monitor, and publish APIs all in one location.

Introduction

✨Observing and Viewing an API in Postman

Thanks to Postman Monitors, you have constant access to information on the functionality and health of your APIs. While collection-based monitors allow you to execute API test scripts, chain together many queries, and evaluate crucial API processes, uptime monitors will enable you to keep an eye on a particular API endpoint.

OBSERVING AND VIEWING

As soon as the monitor starts up, you'll receive notifications of any system outages or test failures, so you can find and fix problems before your API's users are impacted.

🎇Uptime Monitoring

You may track an API's or website's accessibility with uptime monitoring. There is no requirement to build environments, test scripts, or collections. Enter the URL you want to track (HTTP or HTTPS only) and choose which team members you want to get alerts when an outage occurs.

The URL's accessibility is regularly checked by the uptime monitor as frequently as every minute (premium plans) or every 15 minutes (free plans). The chosen team members are notified via email when Postman discovers downtime.

Utilizing uptime monitors can help you quickly find system outages and ensure that your API or service is always available. The dashboard of the monitor keeps track of uptime information so you can always check the status of your API, analyze historical patterns, or halt it.

🎇 Collection-Based Monitoring

A collection-based monitor executes a series of Postman cloud requests according to your specified schedule. When building a monitor, you select a collection containing the requests you wish to achieve. These can be straightforward requests that check the availability and reachability of an endpoint. More complicated groups can use chained requests, test scripts, and environment variables to verify API functioning and answers.

Depending on your Postman plan, you may set your monitors to run as frequently as you like. Monitors can run as frequently as every five minutes for subscription plans. Monitors can run as frequently as every hour on free subscriptions. You can also designate the area of the planet from which you want to run the collection (paid plans only).

Set up integrations to receive notifications via Slack and other channels or get notified by email if a test fails or errors happen. You can browse previous findings or examine trends over time on the monitor's dashboard because all results are recorded.

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✨Managing and Sharing an API in Postman

You may sync and back up your work with a free Postman account so that you can access it from several devices. You can also work together on your API projects with others if you have a Postman account.

Creating a Postman account is not required; if you'd rather, you can use the desktop application without one. Continue to the section on signing up for a Postman account if you do want to create a Postman account.

You may get assistance with your Postman account by contacting the Postman support staff or reading the account FAQs in the Help Center.

UPDATING AND ACCOUNT SETTINGS

🎇Signing up for Postman

Postman prompts you to log in or register. Choose Create Account. Either a Google account or an email address can be used to register.

To help you personalize your Postman experience, you'll be asked for information about yourself when creating a Postman account, such as your name and role. Enter your data, then choose Continue.

Collaborators and anyone accessing the resources you share or publish will be able to see your updated Postman profile.

🎇Updating Postman Account

You may manage your profile and account settings on your account settings page. Your email address and password are included in your account settings, and your username, bio, and profile picture are included.

You may manage account settings on your account settings page, such as your email address, password, and workspace information. You are prepared to go to work now that you have a Postman account. Your job is continuously backed up when logged into Postman and connected to the Postman servers.

✨Setting up Mock Servers in Postman

You can develop or test against an API before it is ready for production by utilizing mock servers, which simulate an API by returning predetermined data (or without using production data). In Postman, mock servers that return fake data rely on examples saved in a collection. To see how to mock servers and models function together in practice and to discover how to include them into your API workflow, follow the steps below.

SETTING UP MOCK SERVER

Step 1: Sending a request.

Open a new request in Postman by clicking + or by choosing New > HTTP Request. Leave GET selected as the method, and enter https://postman-echo.com/get?test=123 for the request URL. When prepared, choose to Send.

With the help of this request, you can test REST or SOAP clients and practice API calls by calling the Postman Echo service. In the response window, the outcome is displayed.

Step 2: Save the request to a collection

To save the request in a collection, choose Save. To organize your work and develop API processes, you can utilize groups, which are sets of recommendations.

Give your request a name. Choose New Collection from the Save menu instead of an existing collection. Choose to Create after entering C1 as the collection name. To store the request to the new collection, choose to Save next.

Step 3: Save a response as an example

Select Preserve Response > Save as an example to save your reply from the Postman Echo service. The sample is held in the C1 collection below the request.

Expand the C1 collection and the request in the sidebar after choosing Collections, and then select the example to open it.

Select the edit icon next to the example's name to rename it. Rename the illustration E1. Remember that the sample includes the request method, URL, and status code. Postman uses these elements to identify the responses that a mock server returns.

Step 4: Create a mock server for the collection

You're prepared to set up a fake server now that you've added an example to your collection. From the sidebar, choose Collections. Select the Mock collection by clicking the More Actions icon adjacent to the C1 group.

Enter M1 for the mock server name. As required, you can add additional details to your mock server. Select Create Mock Server when you're finished setting the mock server. You can access the mock server anytime by choosing Mock Servers from the sidebar.

Step 5: Send a request to the mock server

You may now request the mock endpoint after creating the fake server M1. Copy the dummy server's URL first. Select Copy Mock URL after selecting Mock Servers in the sidebar, M1 mock server, and Mock Servers.

Create a new request by selecting + or New > HTTP Request. Insert the fictitious URL into the new request, then click Send.

Step 6: Add another example

Add one more example to the C1 collection to show how the mock service's replies depend on your saved criteria. Repeat steps 1 through 3 above to add another request to the group, and this time, use the bid URL https://postman-echo.com/test to keep the response as an example E2.

✨Mocking with the Postman API

You can set up a fake server to imitate an API's functionality for testing or development reasons. You may mock a collection by including examples and creating a fake server in Postman. Using the Postman API, you can also automate the creation of a mock server. Follow the instructions below to learn how to simulate a collection using the Postman API.

MOCKING WITH THE API

Step 1: Set up a collection for mocking

Make a new collection in Postman called test API. You can alternatively establish a brand-new environment called testAPIEnv as an alternative. You will create a mock server for this demonstration to mimic each endpoint in the test API collection and see the answers.

Step 2: Retrieve the collection ID

You must first know the collection ID to simulate a collection using the Postman API. Using the Postman API's GET All Collections endpoint, you may get the ID of the test API collection. If you created an environment, you must also use the GET All Environments endpoint to get its ID.

Step 3: Create a mock server with the Postman API

With the collection ID (and, optionally, the environment ID) in hand, you can create a mock server using the POST Create Mock endpoint.

Step 4: Get the mock server URL

You need to be aware of the mock server URL to send a request to your mock server. You may get the mock server's URL using the GET All Mocks endpoint. Create a new proposal in Postman, choose to GET as the method, and type https://api.getpostman.com/mocks as the URL.

Step 5: Send a request to the mock server

You are now prepared to use your collection to mimic requests. Use the mock server URL and add the request path to send a request to the mock server: {{mockURL}}/path.

Refer to the following video for more details on Setting up Mock Servers with Some Examples in Postman:

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Postman just a tool for testing APIs?

Postman is a rest client program initially only available as a native application for Chrome. Postman is mainly used for API testing, allowing you to test your APIs using various request method types, including post, put, and others, as well as parameters, headers, and cookies.

What is the Postman API capable of?

Developers can easily create, share, test, and document APIs with Postman, an API client. Users are given the ability to generate, store, and read both simple and complicated HTTP/s requests as well as their responses to achieve this. If Postman isn't already set up, you'll need to download and set it up.

What in Postman is a header?

The extra data sent to the user or the server in an HTTP request or response is known as a header. The headers in Postman are displayed on the Headers tab.

How many methods does Postman have?

The Postman program ships by default with 15 HTTP methods.

Conclusion

In this article, we have discussed Setting up mock servers with some examples in postman. We also learned about the benefits of using the Setting up mock servers with some examples in postman. Most important are the steps to follow for mocking in the Setting up mock servers with some examples in postman. Moreover, we have discussed Managing and Sharing an API in Postman. 

To learn more about the API, check out our articles on:

  • Web Testing
     
  • API Testing
     
  • API
     

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